Bye bye VDI? See you, EUC? Was 2013 was the LAST year of VDI?

rip-tombstone-hiIn my skim across the interwebs today, especially seeing how BASF in Germany are deploying 112,000 employees on Office 365 in the cloud, a thought struck me: has VDI had it’s day?  Some of us have been doing it for over 10 years.  TEN YEARS.  It has always been a hack to solve a number of problems caused by people trying to use Microsoft Windows and Windows-based applications in scenarios that are very un-Personal Computer.  Windows was designed to be installed locally and accesses locally.  Let’s not go into all the whys-and-wherefores of VDI, that’s old history.

Consider this piece as a tapas food for thought.  I’m not presenting deep research, but I am seeking to kick off a meme….

We have a maturing kid on the block, called Cloud, and it might just shove VDI (or End User Compute, or whatever marketing name you want) to the side.  Why?  Because it solves the original problem!  You run your apps, data, identities and everything else in a cloud (public, partner, private, or combo) and then just give a nice dumb connection to that cloud… or a rich one even… but you don’t need all the VDI expense in between.

What you need these days is a cloud back end (like BASF chose Microsoft Office 365) and then access management with things variously named as Enterprise Mobility Management.  But you don’t need all the VDI/EUC fat in your DC.  That massive VDI-optimised Vblock / FlexPod or whatever Storage device it is… Monday morning boot storms etc… gone.

Cloud and Mobility is removing the love handles of IT, and that is great news for customers!

This has huge implications for the industry that have developed solutions to solve the problems that VDI/EUC created (yes, like coding when you fix a bit of code you create more problems, well the VDI/EUC solution created further problems in identity, storage, network and more).  Any company that has VDI or EUC as a core revenue strategy might be a worry, but I’m sure they have smart enough people to have avoided the cloud iceberg that is about to sink their VDI/EUC Titanic.

It’s worth doing a little more digging on this…. see what the community thinks…

4 thoughts on “Bye bye VDI? See you, EUC? Was 2013 was the LAST year of VDI?

  1. Barry says:

    The problem generally isn’t your cloud ready applications like 365 but your legacy applications that you need to continue to support. VDI certainly isn’t the only answer to those and not always the best answer but is one answer, solutions like SCCM, RDS, Citrix XenDesktop and XenApp, VMware View and Mirage all have their place in the current hybrid world. If the world was able to start relying on cloud / SaaS applications then I would think Google with Chrome and the Chrome books would be seeing massive inroads into the corporate sector but those legacy applications that need to run on Windows have a lot of life left in the yet.

    With this sentiment

    ” You run your apps, data, identities and everything else in a cloud (public, partner, private, or combo) and then just give a nice dumb connection to that cloud… or a rich one even”

    You could be describing VDI for legacy applications, but replacing the word VDI with Cloud ;)

    Like

    • Definitely, Barry, I do agree. I think we are in a huge transition but I do believe that (a) VDI causes issues, (b) it’s the wrong answer, (c) it’s necessary in some places, (d) it will be a shrinking proposition not a growing one.

      THANKS FOR COMMENTING! Hope you are doing great, pal :)

      Like

  2. The call for VDI was driven in many instances by the enterprise wanting to get out of the technology refresh business, especially upgrading Windows. While they tried to build the infrastructure and roll it out a greater force came along, namely consumerization and BYO. Now the focus changed from the device, to secure the user and their data. Landing in the cloud gives the enterprise the opportunity to give the user choice while still securing the user and their data. Sure VDI will be a bridge for legacy applications, but it won’t be a long term strategy.

    Like

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